Responses to A Grammar of Christian Faith



What people are saying:


Gilbert T. Rowe Professor of Theological Ethics at the Divinity School of Duke University

I believe that A Grammar of Christian Faith is destined, along with the work of Jenson and McClendon, to be the book that signals the recovery of the Christian voice in modernity. Deeply schooled in Wittegenstein, the Church Fathers, Barth, and Yoder, Jones' presentation of Christian convictions is as elegant as it is profound. Anyone committed to serious theological reflection must read this book.

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Samuel Wells

British Theologian

Edited from his review of Grammar in Theology, a British journal.

Reading a heavy two-volume systematic theology is like watching a downhill skier. You know the enterprise is full of dangers, and not really a spectator sport. You look for signs of nerves, and half close your eyes at the sharp corners. But if, as in this case, the skier shows good technique, your confidence gradually grows and you relax, and by the end it becomes an exhilarating experience. This project is a remarkable achievement. It is comprehensive, earthed, mature and nuanced. It never misses a trick. It will be my first point of recourse on many issues for a long time to come.

The most satisfying part of the work comes when Jones, having secured a plausible doctrine of the Trinity, through discarding the negative attributes (immutability, etc.), turns his attention to human nature. He…

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Stephen H. Webb

Professor of Religion and Philosophy at Wabash College

The following review appeared in Reviews in Religion and Theology, 9/5 (2002): 514-515.

“We seem to be at the end of a period that has witnessed the revival of systematic theology. When theology lost confidence in the sixties and seventies, it became increasingly topical and sociological, intervening into practical issues as an aid to other, more serious academic disciplines. The revival of systematic theology was fueled, in part, by the approaching retirement of a whole generation of theologians who entered the academy during its expansionistic years of the post World War Two baby boom. Many of these works attempted to give one last stand to politicized agendas by wrapping them in systematic garb. Few of them seemed to have emerged primarily from the classroom, where, after all, the best professors spend the least amount of time. Few of them, too, tried to be in continuity with systematic theologians…

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William Barr

Professor Emeritus of Theology at Lexington Theological Seminary

 

[The following review by William R. Barr, Professor Emeritus of Theology at Lexington Theological Seminary, appeared in Encounter, vol. 64, no. 1 (2003), pp. 655-74. Response by Jones is posted at the end of the review below. Posted 10/2/03.]

[The following review by William R. Barr, Professor Emeritus of Theology at Lexington Theological Seminary, appeared in Encounter, vol. 64, no. 1 (2003), pp. 655-74. Response by Jones is posted at the end of the review below. Posted 10/2/03.]

 

Karl Barth once remarked that theological discourse must be declarative and bold, because it is based not in human speculation but in the revelation of God. Forthright and bold statements clearly characterize this major theological work by Joe Jones, the summation of a lifetime of study, reflection, and teaching. The author, now professor emeritus of theology and ethics at Christian…

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