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Obituary for Sarah Jane Jones [4-6-16]


 

Obituary for Sarah Jane Jones

March 27, 1938 to April 2, 2016

 

Sarah Jane Jones, born and raised in Oklahoma City, died there on April 2, 2016 from a rare neurological disease, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.

She attended Sequoyah Grade School and Harding Junior High. After attending Classen High School for two years, in 1956 she was in the first class to graduate from the newly constructed Northwest Classen, where she was its first student council president. For two years she attended the University of Oklahoma, and was a member of Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority.

In 1958 she married her high school sweetheart, Joe R. Jones, and they moved to New Haven, CT where Joe became a student at Yale Divinity School. In New Haven she gave birth to two daughters, Serene and Kindy, and obtained a B.S. in Education from Southern Connecticut State University. In 1967 in Richardson, TX, she gave birth to another daughter, Verity. In 1986 she graduated magna cum laude with a M.Ed. in Counseling from Phillips…


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Video Of Charley Rose Interview of Serene Jones [2-8-16]


Friends:

In mid-December of 2015 our daughter Serene Jones, President of Union Theological Seminary in NYC and Johnston Family Professor of Religion and Democracy, was interviewed by Charlie Rose,  nationally known television commentator on CBS and host of a weekly TV program of interviews with interesting public figures. It was a grand engagement between the two, and I intended to post the video of the interview promptly. But I ran into technical difficulties that have now been resolved. The interview is a gem.

Serene is also the current President of the American Academy of Religion, the largest organization of professors teaching religion in the U.S. and was formerly Titus Street Professor of Theology at Yale Divinity School. She has published numerous books and articles, including  Calvin and the Rhetoric of Piety, 1995; Feminist Theory and Christian Theology: Cartographies of Grace, 2000; Trauma and Grace: Theology in a Ruptured World, 2009. In 2010 she was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters by her undergraduate alma mater, the University of Oklahoma.

 
Comments welcomed.
 
Joe


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Serene Jones on Iran and Millennials [7-19-15]


Friends:

In June our daughter, Serene Jones, President of Union Theological Seminary and the Johnston Family Professor for Religion and Democracy, was part of a small group of American religious scholars invited by a group of Iranian religious scholars to visit  Iran for a consultation on religious diversity and peacemaking. In response to the recent accord reached by Iran, President Obama and other western leaders, Serene posted the following article for Religion News Service on July 15th, which was widely distributed and appeared in the Washington Post.

I found it hopeful and insightful. Comments welcomed.

____________________________________

 

My prayer: Iran deal will help millennials in US and Iran bridge the divides

By Serene Jones | Religion News Service July 15

I woke up Tuesday (July 14) to buzz after buzz on my phone — texts flooding in from young Iranians I had met in June, celebrating the historic nuclear agreement that had just been announced.

Only a few weeks have passed since I visited Iran with a select interfaith U.S. delegation, where we worked to break down the cultural and religious barriers that separate…


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Climate Change and the Ambiguities and Beauty of Life [5-21-15]


Friends:

Yes, it is true that almost invariably my day starts—very early, I confess—reading hurriedly through the online version of the New York Times. It is a long-term habit. And, if you are a subscriber to my website, then you also know I sometimes call your attention to articles that seemed discerning, upbuilding, and occasionally entertaining. Well, here are a couple of recent articles that I think are worth your time to read and to ponder

The Stone section in the Times is that place where folks often called ‘philosophers’ write and argue about perennial and current issues of life and death, of meaning and despair, of social/political  and personal patterns of living and dying. Recently that section of the Times contained a lucid and honest conversation about climate change and life on this planet between Gary Gutting, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame and Dale Jamieson, Professor of Environmental Studies and Philosophy at New York University on “What Can We Do About Climate Change?” It is sobering and worth your time.

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/05/18/can-green-virtues-help-us-survive-climate-change/

Roger Cohen is an OP-ED Columnist for the NYTimes and in the past…


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Reflections on Red Muskogee and Blue Baltimore [5-8-15]


Dear Friends:

Thomas Edsall is a regular political and social critic for the NYTimes and his articles are usually full of statistical analyses of deep controversial issues. His tact is to marshal some statistical studies and solicit some responsive comments from carefully selected ‘authorities’ and observers about those issues. A recent article by him entitled Sex, Drugs and Poverty in Red and Blue America was an arresting discussion of and comparison between Red Muskogee, Oklahoma and Blue Baltimore, Maryland. In its own right the article is sobering, but it was especially interesting about Muskogee, Oklahoma, the small city toward which Sarah and lived when we moved to our cottage on Ft. Gibson Lake in eastern Oklahoma. I will say more about Muskogee below.

But the main question posed by Edsall is whether Red/Republican political rhetoric and practice has actually produced social improvements in cities/states in which they have been the primary political power, in comparison to the obviously Blue/Democratic Baltimore of recent infamy in the news. Edsall concludes, after examining a range of social statistics that cities/states in which Red/Republicans have been in charge have not been any more successful at addressing and solving…


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